The Biblical Lifestyle
 
 

Preparing men and women for the soon Advent of Jesus by obedience to God's Word and the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ

Sunday Law

Sunday Legislation under the Roman Empire
SL0001 A Critical History of Sunday Legislation A H Lewis 1888

A. H. Lewis, D. D., who spent years of study and research on this subject, declares, that “the pagan religion of Rome had many holidays, on which partial or complete cessation of business and labor were demanded,” and that Constantine by his Sunday law was “merely adding one more festival to the festi of the empire.’—“A critical History of Sunday Legislation from 321 to 1888 A. D.,” pp.8, 12.  New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1888.

            This is clearly seen when we carefully examine all the circumstances presented by Dr. Lewis:

            1.  Constantine’s Sunday edict was given March 7, 321.  The very next day he issued and edict commanding purely heathen superstition.  We quote:

            “The August Emperor Constantine to Maximus:

            “If any part of the palace or other public works shall be struck by lightning, let the soothsayers, following old usages, inquire into the meaning of the portent, and let their written words, very carefully collected, be reported to our knowledge.”

            Id., p. 19.

              2.  The Caesars for over a century had been worshipers of the sun-god, whose weekly holiday was Sunday.  Dr. Lewis says:  “The sun-worship cult had grown steadily in the Roman Empire for a long time.” –Id., p. 20.  He then quotes the following from Schaff in regard to Elagabalus, a Roman Caesar of a century before Constantine’s time:

            “The abandoned youth, El-Gabal or Heliogabalus (218-222), who polluted the throne by the blackest vices and follies, tolerated all religions in the hope of at last merging them in his favorite Syrian worship of the sun with its abominable excesses.  He himself was a priest of the god of the sun, and thence took his name.”—Id., pp. 20, 21.

            Dr. Lewis further says that Aurelian, who reigned from, 270-276 A. D., embellished the temple of the Sun with “above fifteen thousand pounds of gold.”—“History of Sunday Legislation,” p. 23.  Diocletian, who reigned from 284 to 305, “appealed in the face of the army to the all-seeing deity of the sun.” –Id., p. 21.

SL0001a A Critical History of Sunday Legislation A H Lewis 321 to 1888.pdf
SL0001a A Critical History of Sunday Legislation A H Lewis 321 to 1888.pub

A Proposal to Subvert the Constitution
SL0002 A Proposal to Subvert the Constitution.pdf
SL0002 A Proposal to Subvert the Constitution.pub

For Sunday Legislation
SL0003 A Rein of Terror.pdf
SL0003 A Rein of Terror.pub

Suggestions for Sunday Law
SL0004 An Undesirable Ally.pdf
SL0004 An Undesirable Ally.pub

Sunday Law Civil & Religious Liberty
SL0005 Religious Legislation Darkening the World.pdf
SL0005 Religious Legislation Darkening the World.pub

Political Pressure
SL0006 The Thin Edge of the Wedge.pdf
SL0006 The Thin Edge of the Wedge.pub

Sunday Legistion from 321 to 1888
SL0007 A Critical History of Sunday Legislation From 321 to 1888 A H Lewis.pdf
SL0007 A Critical  History of Sunday Legislation From 321 to 1888 A H Lewis.pub

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