The Biblical Lifestyle
 
 

Preparing men and women for the soon Advent of Jesus by obedience to God's Word and the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ

Sunday


Letter from the Smithsonian Institution
SU0001 Smithsonian Institution Sunday Sept. 1 1949.pdf
SU0001 Smithsonian Institution Sunday Sept. 1 1949.pub

Antecedents of Baptism

SU0002 Christian Baptism A Campbell 1853 Relics of Popery
Campbell (“Baptism,” p.15), speaking of the Protestant sects, says:-
“All of them retain in their bosom—in their ecclesiastical organizations, worship, doctrines, and observances—various relics if popery.  They are at best a reformation of popery, and only reformations in part.  The doctrines and traditions of men yet impair the power and progress of the gospel their hands
SU0002a Christian Baptism with its Antecedents and Consequents A Campbell 1853.pdf
SU0002a Christian Baptism with its Antecedents and Consequents A Campbell 1853.pub

Infringement of Natural Rights
SU0003 A Critical History of Sunday Legislation A H Lewis 1888.pdf
SU0003 A Critical History of Sunday Legislation A H Lewis 1888.pub

"Day of the Lord"

SU0004 A Dictionary of Christian Antiquities 1880          
“But the undoubted fact of this [Sunday] observance by no means involves the inference often drawn from it, that the keeping of the [Sunday] Lord’s day must be traced to an apostolic decree, transferring to it, directly or by implication, the sanctity of the Sabbath, which was familiar to the early Christians, as being themselves Jews, or having been converted under Jewish influence.  It is almost needless to say that of such a decree we have no evidence whatever, either in Holy Scripture or in church history.” –Alfred Barry (Anglican), Art. “Lord’s Day” in “A Dictionary of the Christian Antiquities” (edited by William Smith and Samuel Cheetham), Vol. 2, p. 1043, col. 1.  (John Murray, London: 1880)

SU0004a  A Dictionary of Christian Antiquities W Smith & S Cheetham Lord's Day 1880.pdf
SU0004a  A Dictionary of Christian Antiquities W Smith & S Cheetham Lord's Day 1880.pub

Sunday the Lord's resurrection

SU0005 A Dictionary of the Bible p 356 Lords Day Smith 1872
“Taken separately, perhaps, and even all together, these [New Testament] passages seem scarcely adequate to prove that the dedication of the first day of the week to the purposes above mentioned was a matter of apostolic institution, or even of apostolic practice.” –William Smith (Non-conformist), “A dictionary of the Bible” (one volume edition). P. 356, Art. “Lord’s day.”  (Fleming H. Revell Company. New York City.)

SU0005a  A Dictionary of the Bible W Smith Lord's Day 1872.pdf
SU0005a  A Dictionary of the Bible W Smith Lord's Day 1872.pub

Christianity late sixteenth century did not identify Sabbath & Lord's day
SU0006 An Encyclopedia of Region Sunday 1945.pdf
SU0006 An Encyclopedia of Region Sunday 1945.pub

Astrology & Religion
SU0007 Astrology & Religion among the Greeks & Romans           
“Aurelian  … created a new cult of the ‘Invincible Son.’ Worshipped in a splendid temple, served by pontiffs who were raised to the level of the ancient pontiffs of Rome.  … On establishing this new state cult, Aurelian in reality proclaimed the dethronement of the old Roman idolatry and the accession of Semitic Sun-Worship.”  Franz Cumont, Astrology and Religion among the Greeks and Romans, p. 55, 56

SU0007a Astrology and Religion among the Greeks and Romans F Cumont.pdf
SU0007a Astrology and Religion among the Greeks and Romans F Cumont.pub

First day of the week
SU0008 Cyclopaedia Lord's Day J Kitto 1846 & 1854.pdf
SU0008 Cyclopaedia Lord's Day J Kitto 1846 & 1854.pub

Resurrection of Christ
SU0009 Cyclopaedia Lord's Day J M'Clintock & J Strong 1883.pdf
SU0009 Cyclopaedia Lord's Day J M'Clintock & J Strong 1883.pub

Name & Change of day
SU00010 Cyclopaedis Sunday J M'Clintock & J Strong 1886.pdf
SU00010 Cyclopaedis Sunday J M'Clintock & J Strong 1886.pub

Eight studies of the Lord's Day

SU00011 Eight Studies on the Lord's Day                                   Presbyterian  Rev. George S. Gray, D. D. “Thus the new day became, in a far higher sense that the old, a seal of loyalty.  Without one recorded word of specific command for its observance; with out one item of prescribed ritual for its exercises; without one term of definition for its limits, it was the free spontaneous homage of a loyalty that went beyond obedience.  Eight studies on the Lord’s Day.  P. 253
SU00011a  Eight Studies of The Lord's Day G S 1885.pdf
SU00011a  Eight Studies of The Lord's Day G S 1885.pub

Memory of our Savior's resurrection
SU00012 Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge Sunday 1837.pdf
SU00012 Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge Sunday 1837.pub

Sunday-Law Placard
SU00013 Sunday-Law Placard Jan 16 1890.pdf
SU00013 Sunday-Law Placard Jan 16 1890.pub

Mithraic origin of Sunday

SU00014 Survivals of Roman Religion          
“Our observance of Sunday as the Lord’s Day is apparently derived from Mithraism.  The argument that has sometimes been used against this claim, namely, that Sunday was chosen because of the resurrection on that day, is not well supported.” Gordon J. Laing, Survivals of Roman Religion, p. 148.

SU00014a Survivals of Roman Religion G J Laing 1963.pdf
SU00014a Survivals of Roman Religion G J Laing 1963.pub

Christian weekly festival
SU00015 The Americana Sunday.pdf
SU00015 The Americana Sunday.pub

The American Sabbath
SU00016 The Civil Sabbath W F Crafts 1891.pdf
SU00016 The Civil Sabbath W F Crafts 1891.pub

Law relating to Sunday
SU00017 The Encycopaedia Britannica Sunday 1895.pdf
SU00017 The Encycopaedia Britannica Sunday 1895.pub

The Lord's day Alliance
SU00018 The Lord's Day Alliance of the United States.pdf
SU00018 The Lord's Day Alliance of the United States.pub

Day of the Sun

SU00019 Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious
We read in the Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge:  Sixty-six years later, 387 A.D. in another Roman decree, Sunday is called ‘The Lord’s Day.’ This constitutes legal recognition of the Christian name for the day. . . . In 392 A.D. in another Roman decree for bade on that day all exhibitions that might turn away attendance from the mysteries of the Christian religion.  The Sunday legislation of the Roman empire never went backward. . . .In the time of Justinian, 685 A.D., the laws of the empire on the subject were gathered into the codes, which contained the law of the Roman Empire, and from the year 800, when Charlemagne was crowned, this code was of force and effect all over the ‘Holy Roman Empire.’ . . .  During the Middle Ages there were decrees and canons of popes and of councils concerning the observance of Sunday, which though ecclesiastical, were of civil force because enforced by the civil power (Vol. XI, page 147).  
Not until the time of the Carolingians [the line of kings that began with Charlemagne] did the idea of substitution of Sunday for the Old-Testament Sabbath prevail in Christian Europe.  Charlemagne’s numerous, strict Sunday regulations were explicitly based upon the Old-Testament command to keep the Sabbath day holy “Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia subject of “Sunday:”

 

SU00019A Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia Sunday vol 6          
“Sunday (Dies Solis, of the Roman calendar; ‘day of the sun,’ because dedicated to the sun), the first day of the week, was adopted by the early Christians as a day of worship.  The ‘sun’ of Latin adoration they interpreted as the ‘Sun of Righteousness.’ … No regulations for its observance are laid down in the New Testament, nor indeed, is its observance even enjoined.”  
Vol. 6

SU00019b  The New Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge Sunday Schaff & Herzog 1911.pdf
SU00019b  The New Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge Sunday Schaff & Herzog 1911.pub

Christians adoped Sunday as the worship day
SU00020 First of all, I Read from H. G. Wells, in his Outline of History:

 “During this indefinite time a consideralle amount of a sort of theocrasia seems to have gone on between the Christian cult and the almost equally popular and widely diffused Mithraic cult, and the cult of Serapis-Isis-Horus.  From the former it would seem the Christians adopted Sun-day as their chief day of worship instead of the Jewish Sabbath.” – The Outline of History, New and Revised, by H. G. Wells. P. 543

P.431

SU00020a  The outline of History H G Wells Vol 1.pdf
SU00020a  The outline of History H G Wells Vol 1.pub

The weekly festival of our Lords resurrection
SU00021 The Westminster Bible Dictionary T J Shepherd  Lord's Day 1880.pdf
SU00021 The Westminster Bible Dictionary T J Shepherd  Lord's Day 1880.pub

The Lord's Day
SU00022 Theological Dictionary C Buck  Sunday 1851.pdf
SU00022 Theological Dictionary C Buck  Sunday 1851.pub

Anciently dedicated to the Sun
SU00023 Webster's unabriged Dictionary Sunday          
As proof that Sunday was the heathen festival day, we quote from “Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary.”  That book says that Sunday is “so called because the day was anciently dedicated to the sun, or to its worship

SU00023a  Webster's Dictionary N Webster Vol 1 Sunday 1828.pdf
SU00023a Webster's Dictionary N Webster Vol 1 Sunday 1828.pub

Sunday Obervance
SU00024 Grolier Encyclopedia 1946.pdf
SU00024 Grolier Encyclopedia 1946.pub

Dies Solis of the Roman Calendar
SU00025 Religious Encyclopaedia P Schaff & Herzog Sunday 1894.pdf
SU00025 Religious Encyclopaedia P Schaff & Herzog Sunday 1894.pub

Sunday of the nineteenth Century

SU00026a The North British Review Vol XVIII Nov 1852- Feb 1853
In Babylon the sun-god was called Bel, in Phœnicia and Palestine, Baal, and Sun-day was “The wild solar holiday of all pagan times.” – “North British Review,” Vol. XVIII, p. 409.

The North British Review gives the following reasons for the Christians’ adopting the heathen Sun-day:  “That very day was the Sunday of their heathen neighbors and respective countrymen, and patriotism gladly united with expediency in making it at once their Lord’s day and their Sabbath. . . .  That primitive church, in fact, was shut up to the adoption of the Sunday, -- until it became established and supreme, when it was too late to make another alteration.” – Vol. XVIII, p. 409. Edinburgh: Feb., 1853.

SU00026 The North British Review Vol XVIII Nov 1852-Feb 1853.pdf
SU00026 The North British Review Vol XVIII Nov 1852-Feb 1853.pub

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