The Biblical Lifestyle
 
 

Preparing men and women for the soon Advent of Jesus by obedience to God's Word and the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ

Week


Chronology

W0001 The Catholic Encyclopedia Chronology Vol 3 p 740 July 1946
           
“It is to be noted that in the Christian period the order of the days of the week has never been interrupted.  Thus, when Gregory XIII reformed the calendar, in 1582, Thursday, October 4th, was followed by Friday, October 15th.  So in England, in 1752, Wednesday, September 2nd, was followed by Thursday, September 14th.” – Vol. 3, P. 740, art. “Chronology.”  Quoted by “Our Times” – July, 1946 – p. 9.
W0001a The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol III Chronoogy Week.pdf
W0001a The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol III Chronoogy Week.pub

First step for mankind to measure their time
W0002 Gilfillan the Sabbth p 364 365

            “Let it suffice, however, in a matter on which there is so general an agreement, to present the words of four eminent authors:  ‘The septenary arrangement of the days,’ says Scaliger,’ was in use among the Orientals from the remotest antiquity.’  ‘We have reason to believe,’ observes President De Goguet, ‘that the institution of that short period of seven days, called a week, was the first step taken by mankind in dividing and measuring their time.  We find, from time immemorial, the use of this period among all nations, without any variation in the form of it.  The Israelites, Assyrians, Egyptians, Indians, Arabians, and, in a word, all the nations of the East, have in all ages made use of a week, consisting of seven days.  We find the same custom among the ancient Romans, Gauls, Britons, Germans, the nations of the North, and of America.’  According to Laplace, ‘the week is perhaps the most ancient and incontestable monument of human knowledge.’  It would appear that the Chinese, who have now no Sabbath, at one time honored the seventh day of the week.”

 

Gilfillan                         “The Sabbath,”             Pages 364, 365.

W0002a The Sabbath J Gilfillan 1862.pdf
W0002a The Sabbath J Gilfillan 1862.pub

Letter from Royal Observatory
W0003 Royal Observatory Mar 4 1932 F W Dyson.pdf
W0003 Royal Observatory Mar 4 1932 F W Dyson.pub

Letter from Smithsonian Institution
W0004 Smithsonian Institution Sep 1 1949.pdf
W0004 Smithsonian Institution Sep 1 1949.pub

Chronology
W0005 The Catholic Encyclopedia Chronology 1908.pdf
W0005 The Catholic Encyclopedia Chronology 1908.pub

A division of time
W0006 The Jewish Encycdopedia Vil 12 p 481
           
“WEEK (Hebrew, ‘shabua’, plural ‘shabu’im,’ ‘shabu’ot; . . . New Testament Greek, sabbaton, sabbata):  A division of time comprising seven days, thus explaining the Hebrew name.”—The Jewish Encyclopedia, vol. 12, p. 481, art. “Week.”

W0006a The Jewish Encyclopedia 1907 (week).pdf
W0006a The Jewish Encyclopedia 1907 (week).pub

A primeval Sabbath the ancient heathen
W0007 The Literature of the Sabbath Question Cox Vol 1 p 275 276
           
Homer says, “Then came the seventh day that is sacred.”  Again, “It was the seventh day, wherein all things were finished, or perfected.” – “The Literature of the Sabbath Question,” Cox, volume 1, pages 275, 276.

W0007a The Sabbath Question R Cox Orgin of the week.pdf
W0007a The Sabbath Question R Cox Orgin of the week.pub

The Gods of Babylonia & Assyrua
W0008 The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria R W Rogers 1908.pdf
W0008 The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria R W Rogers 1908.pub

Letter from Naval Observatory
W0009 U S Naval Observatory Washington D C Mar 12 1932.pdf
W0009 U S Naval Observatory Washington D C Mar 12 1932.pub

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